Grand Seiko Introduces the 60th Anniversary Diver 600M SLGA001

Next-gen 9RA5.

Having just unveiled the impressive 9SA5 automatic movement in the Hi-Beat 80 Hours SLGH002 as part of its 60th anniversary line-up, Grand Seiko is also rolling out a newly-developed Spring Drive movement – the first with a five-day power reserve and thermocompensation. Unusually, the new calibre is making its debut in a dive watch, the Grand Seiko 600M Professional Diver’s watch (ref. SLGA001).

Characterised by large, angular lugs, case design of the new diver is familiar, borrowing from the current Grand Seiko high-frequency dive watches. In short, it’s the typical Grand Seiko diver look, meaning big, bold and chunky, measuring 46.9 mm in diameter and 16 mm high.

Both the case and bracelet are made of Seiko’s proprietary “high-intensity” titanium, which 30% lighter than steel and more resistant to scratches, so the size of the SLGA001 does not translate into substantial weight.

Likewise, the dark blue dial retains the usual Grand Seiko dive watch styling. Legibility is maximised with large hands and hour markers – both with generous amounts of luminous paint.

The date display on the new diver is at four o’clock, instead of the usual three o’clock. But the date is not just a relocation – thanks to the new 9RA5 movement, the date disc jumps at a “greatly increased” speed for a crisper changeover.

The 9RA5

While the design of the watch contains no surprises, the Spring Drive movement inside is brand new and incorporates several features originally found in the top-of-the-line 9F quartz movement.

To recap, Spring Drive is Seiko’s hybrid-mechanical movement that has a mainspring and gear train but is electronically regulated. The going train powers a glide wheel that generates a small electrical current, which in turn powers an integrated circuit (IC) regulated by quartz oscillator. Relying on the quartz oscillator as a reference timekeeper, the IC regulates the speed of the glide wheel by applying an electromagnetic braking force to it when necessary.

The 9RA5

The 9RA5 in the new diver is a newly-developed calibre that’s the first in a new generation of Spring Drive movements. At heart it is an upgrade to the venerable 9R6X family of Spring Drive movements, having been revised from end to end, from mainspring to IC.

Intensive upgrades

Equipped with a new IC, the 9RA5 enjoys a jump in accuracy, going from within 15 seconds a month for the earlier generation of movements, to just 10 seconds. One of the reasons behind the rise in accuracy are the specially-selected, three-month aged quartz crystals: each movement receives a cherry-picked quartz crystals that exhibits the greatest stability during testing – which is also of the features of the 9F quartz calibre.

Also, the 9RA5 marks the first time that a Spring Drive IC incorporates a temperature sensor to compensate for temperature-induced variations to the vibrations of the quartz crystal. And to prevent the effects of environmental factors such as humidity, static electricity or light, the oscillator and sensor are vacuum-sealed in a capsule, once again something first found in the 9F.

The new movement also has a full bridge on top with a frosted finish, continuing the aesthetic first seen on last year’s 9R31 Spring Drive movement

Mechanically, the 9RA5 has been designed to be slimmer, so it is 5.0 mm high, versus the 5.8 mm of its predecessor, the 9R65. This was achieved by restructuring the movement’s gear train, arranging it in a smaller space around the centre of the movement where all of the wheels are secured by a single bridge. Having the gear train under a single bridge also improves shock resistance and movement rigidity, a useful feature for a sports watch.

And the movement also uses mainspring barrels operating in series that provide a power reserve of five days, instead of one large barrel. Intriguingly, the twin barrels are of different sizes – Grand Seiko terms them Dual-Size Barrels – a necessity to maximise the available space within the movement.

The smaller and larger twin barrels

To further optimise the real estate inside the case, the winding mechanism was also tweaked.

Seiko invented the Magic Lever winding system in 1959, creating a simple, efficient, and no-nonsense mechanism consisting of a rotor that drive two pawls, which alternately turn a winding gear in one direction. Though robust and easy to assemble – which is why it is still in use by Seiko as well as Swiss watchmakers six decades later – the Magic Lever takes up significant space.

In the 9RA5, the geometry of the pawls were tweaked, which reduces the movement thickness yet retains the same winding efficiency – creating a mechanism Grand Seiko labels the Offset Magic Lever.

The Offset Magic Lever along with the Dual-Size Barrels

The redesigned Magic Lever


Key facts and price

Grand Seiko 60th Anniversary Professional Diver’s 600M
Ref. SLGA001

Diameter: 46.9 mm
Height: 16.0 mm
Material: Titanium
Water resistance: 600 m

Movement: 9RA5
Features: Hours, minutes, seconds, date, and power reserve indicator
Winding: Automatic
Power reserve: 120 hours (5 days)

Strap: Titanium bracelet, and additional blue silicone strap

Limited edition: 700 watches
Availability: 
From August 2020 at Grand Seiko boutiques and retailers
Price: US$11,100, or ¥1.15 million (prices exclude taxes)

For more, visit Seikowatches.com.


 

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Grand Seiko Introduces the First GS 1960 Re-Creation (Including in Titanium)

Now regular production.

Sometimes known as the “3180” after the movement inside, the very first Grand Seiko model of 1960 is an indisputably important watch in the history of the brand.

Unsurprisingly, the first Grand Seiko has been remade on several occasions as commemorative limited editions. For the 60th anniversary of Grand Seiko, a “re-creation” of the first Grand Seiko is being added to the regular collection – including a surprising version with a titanium case.

With reissues of the 3180 having been done for the 120th and 130th anniversary of Seiko, and most recently in 2017 when Grand Seiko was spun off as an independent brand, the 3180 remake is now on its fourth iteration, making it pretty familiar. The latest remakes might not please anyone who owns the preceding editions, but for anyone who missed out they are spot on.

But the new re-creation is distinct in several ways. The case is 38 mm, larger than the 35 mm original, and identical to the 2017 edition. More notably, it has a sapphire case back, a first for a 3180 remake.

The 9S64 visible through the display back

Three versions are available, each distinguished in material and dial colour but also in more subtle details.

The top-of-the-line model is the platinum re-creation SBGW257. This has a solid gold dial matched with solid gold hour markers, as well as an engraved logo at 12 o’clock, a detail inspired by the dials of early 3180s. Because of the precious metal dial, it has a small star at above six o’clock, which is the Grand Seiko “SD” emblem, short for “special dial”.

The monochromatic platinum version with its engraved logo

The re-creation in 18k yellow gold SBGW258 also has a “special dial”, but one that features only solid gold hour markers. And the Grand Seiko logo is raised, instead of engraved.

The relief logo on the gold model

The most affordable – and most unusual – is the re-creation in titanium SBGW259. It marks the first time Grand Seiko is using a titanium case on a vintage remake.

Specifically, the case is Brilliant Hard Titanium, an alloy proprietary to Seiko that has greater surface hardness than stainless steel. In comparison, ordinary titanium is softer than stainless steel, making it prone to scratches.

The material is also more silvery in colour than standard titanium, which is a medium-to-dark grey. As a result of the colour and hardness, Brilliant Hard Titanium can be polished to a more lustrous shine than its standard counterpart.

The titanium version also has a metallic, dark blue dial, which is also a first for a vintage remake.

All three watches have the same 9S64 inside, a hand-wound calibre with a three-day power reserve.


Key facts

Grand Seiko 60th Anniversary Re-creation of the first Grand Seiko
Ref. SBGW257 (platinum)
Ref. SBGW258 (yellow gold)
Ref. SBGW259 (titanium)

Diameter: 38 mm
Height: 10.9 mm
Material: Platinum, 18k yellow gold, or titanium
Water resistance: 30 m

Movement: 9S64
Features: Hours, minutes, and seconds
Winding: Hand-wound
Frequency: 28,800 beats per hour (4 Hz)
Power reserve: 72 hours

Strap: Crocodile with folding clasp

Limited edition: No
Availability:
From June 2020 at Grand Seiko boutiques
Price: Platinum – US$38,000, or ¥4 million; yellow gold – US$26,000, or ¥2.8 million; titanium – US$8,000, 0r ¥850,000 (prices exclude taxes)

For more, visit Grand-seiko.com.


 

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Grand Seiko Introduces the Elegance Collection ’60th Anniversary’ Engraved

The SBGW263 and SBGW264.

Twenty-twenty marks the 60th year of Grand Seiko and the brand is pulling no punches with its high-end commemorative editions. Dedicated to Grand Seiko’s workshop in the town of Shizukuishi, the 60th anniversary pair of Elegance Collection Thin Dress watches both feature decorative engraving, but executed by hand and machine respectively.

Located in the northern province of Iwate, Shizukuishi is a small town surrounded by mountains, including the imposing Mount Iwate, which is an active volcano. The town is home to the Shizukuishi Watch Studio, where the best mechanical Grand Seiko watches are produced (Spring Drive watches, on the other hand, are produced at Seiko-Epson’s facility in Shiojiri in Nagano province).

Elegance Collection ’60th Anniversary’ hand-engraved SBGW263 (left) and machine-engraved SBGW264

Shizukuishi, or しずく いし, translates literally as “water droplet on stone” – shizuku is “droplet” and ishi means “stone”. Legend has it that the town was founded a millennia ago when an old man living in the area heard the sound of dripping water, which originated in a cave where water from the ceiling was dripping onto the rocks below.

The Grand Seiko Elegance Collection Thin Dress ’60th Anniversary’ Hand Engraved (ref. SBGW263) is a nod to the ancient origin story. It featured a solid gold dial hand engraved with a motif inspired by the town’s founding.

Made entirely of 18k white gold, the dial is comprised of three parts – base, chapter ring for the hours, and the outermost minute track. Each element is engraved by the Shizukuishi Watch Studio’s team of engravers led by Kiyoshi Terui, which usually dedicates its skills to engraving skeletonised movements.

Like the other Thin Dress models, this anniversary edition has a domed dial, which means each part of the dial is gently curved, making the engraving all the more challenging.

All of the markings on the dial are hand engraving, including the Grand Seiko logo and the tiny star above six o’clock, which is the Grand Seiko “SD” emblem, short for “special dial” and indicating that the dial is solid gold. And in a first for Grand Seiko, even the hands of the watch are engraved.

In order to accommodate the engraved, solid-gold dial, which is thicker than a standard  brass dial, the platinum case had to be reworked. The case is 0.2 mm thicker than the standard Thin Dress case, with its back secured by four screws, instead of being screw down.

But the movement inside remains the manual-wind 9S64 found in the standard Thin Dress models. It has a three-day power reserve and Seiko’s proprietary, high-performance escapement featuring skeletonised parts fabricated by a MEMS technique of metal deposition.

The same movement is found inside the Grand Seiko Elegance Collection Thin Dress ’60th Anniversary’ (ref. SBGW264). It’s similarly inspired by the town of Shizukuishi, albeit from a different perspective.

The watch has a dark green dial that’s meant to evoke the forests around the Shizukuishi Watch Studio. It is also engraved, but by machine to create a fine, geometric pattern that catches the light.

The SBGW264 has the standard Thin Dress case with a display back, but in 18k rose gold.


Key facts

Grand Seiko Elegance Collection Thin Dress ’60th Anniversary’ Hand Engraved
Ref. SBGW263

Diameter: 39 mm
Height: 11.8 mm
Material: Platinum
Water resistance: 30 m

Movement: 9S64
Features: Hours, minutes, and seconds
Winding: Hand wound
Frequency: 28,800 beats per hour (4 Hz)
Power reserve: 72 hours

Strap: Crocodile with folding clasp

Limited edition: 20 watches
Availability: 
From July 2020 at Grand Seiko boutiques
Price: US$97,000, or ¥10 million (prices exclude tax)


Grand Seiko Elegance Collection Thin Dress ’60th Anniversary’ Engraved
Ref. SBGW264

Diameter: 39 mm
Height: 11.6 mm
Material: 18k rose gold
Water resistance: 30 m

Movement: 9S64
Features: Hours, minutes, and seconds
Winding: Hand wound
Frequency: 28,800 beats per hour (4 Hz)
Power reserve: 72 hours

Strap: Crocodile with pin buckle

Limited edition: 120 watches
Availability:
From July 2020 at Grand Seiko boutiques and salons
Price: US$24,000, or ¥2.5 million (prices exclude tax)

For more, visit Grand-seiko.com.


 

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Seiko Introduces the Diver’s Watch 55th Anniversary Trilogy

62MAS, Hi-Beat, and Tuna remakes.

Seiko has been on a hot streak with its remakes of vintage dive watches, including the Hi-Beat 6159 of 2018 and last year’s “Turtle” 6105.

With 2020 being the 55th anniversary of its first dive watch, Seiko is reissuing three of its most well-liked vintage dive watches, the Hi-Beat 6215, the 62MAS 6217, and the “Tuna” 6159. All three remakes features notable upgrades, including the use of a new alloy named Ever-Brilliant Steel that is notably corrosion resistant.

(And for those on a less-ambitious budget, the line-up also includes an affordable 62MAS remake – see this at the bottom of the story.)

The vintage originals (from left): Hi-Beat 6215, the 62MAS 6217, and the “Tuna” 6159

Used for the first time in watchmaking according to Seiko, Ever-Brilliant Steel has a more silvery appearance than the steel alloy most commonly used in watchmaking – 316L or “surgical steel” – but more crucially, the alloy has better corrosion resistant.

Specifically, Seiko says Ever-Brilliant Steel has a pitting resistance equivalent number (PREN) of 1.7 times 316L steel. With 316L steel having a PREN of around 25, Ever-Brilliant Steel should surpass 40 – usually the benchmark for materials uses for marine applications.

The Ever-Brilliant Steel case of the SLA037

The 1965 Diver’s Re-creation “62MAS” (ref. SLA037 or SBEX009) is a remake of Seiko’s first ever dive watch. Measuring 39.9 mm by 14.7 mm, the case is larger than the original, and of course made from Ever-Brilliant Steel. And the dial is a metallic blue-grey that’s unique to the 55th anniversary line-up.

More notable, it is powered by the 8L55, a high-frequency movement operating at 36,000 beats per hour. It’s the highest-end mechanical movement used in Prospex dive watches, which also explains the retail price of a bit over US$6,000.

Based on the ref. 6215-7000 diver of 1968, the 1968 Professional Diver’s 300m Re-creation (ref. SLA039 or SBEX011) is a large, chunky watch with a one-piece case, just like the original, but now in Seiko’s new steel alloy.

Like the 62MAS remake, the dial is the same metallic blue-grey, and it is also equipped with the high-beat 8L55 movement.

And the last of the trio is the 1975 Professional Diver’s 600m Re-creation (ref. SLA041 or SBDX035), which is modelled on the ref. 6159-7010 “Tuna”.

Like the original, it has an inner titanium case surround by a black ceramic shroud, but it boasts several notable improvements. First, the bezel is Ever-Brilliant Steel, and the depth rating is 1000 m, as compared to 600 m on the original.

And the dial is made of pure iron, giving the watch enhanced magnetism of 40,000 A/m – hence the additional red lettering on the dial.

Because the “Tuna” remake is powered by the 8L35, a more ordinary calibre running at 28,800 beats per hour, it also costs less than the other two high-frequency divers.

Though each is a limited edition of 1,100 watches, the first 100 of each model will be sold together in a three-piece set packaged in a large box.


The 55th anniversary range also includes the 1965 Diver’s Modern Re-interpretation (ref. SPB149 or SBDC107), a modern take on the 62MAS with a slightly larger case and entry-level movement.

Limited to 5,500 watches and priced at US$1,350, this remake has the blue-grey anniversary dial, but the case is in standard 316L steel. It is equipped with the 6R35 automatic movement.


Key facts

Seiko Diver’s Watch 55th Anniversary 1965 Diver’s Re-creation “62MAS”
Ref. SLA037 (SBEX009 in Japan)

Diameter: 39.9 mm
Height: 14.7 mm
Material: Steel
Water resistance: 200 m

Movement: 8L55
Features: Hours, minutes, seconds, and date
Winding: Automatic
Frequency: 36,000 beats per hour (5 Hz)
Power reserve: 55 hours

Strap: Silicone with pin buckle

Limited edition: 1,100 watches
Availability: 
From July 2020 at Seiko boutiques and retailers
Price: US$6,300, or ¥650,000 (prices exclude tax)


Seiko Diver’s Watch 55th Anniversary 1968 Professional Diver’s 300m Re-creation “Hi-Beat”
Ref. SLA039 (SBEX011 in Japan)

Diameter: 44.8 mm
Height: 15.7 mm
Material: Steel
Water resistance: 300 m

Movement: 8L55
Features: Hours, minutes, seconds, and date
Winding: Automatic
Frequency: 36,000 beats per hour (5 Hz)
Power reserve: 55 hours

Strap: Silicone with pin buckle

Limited edition: 1,100 watches
Availability: 
From August 2020 at Seiko boutiques and retailers
Price: US$6,800, or ¥700,000 (prices exclude tax)


Seiko Diver’s Watch 55th Anniversary 1975 Professional Diver’s 600m Re-creation “Tuna”
Ref. SLA041 (SBDX035 in Japan)

Diameter: 52.4 mm
Height: 17.2 mm
Material: Titanium inner case with steel bezel and ceramic shroud
Water resistance: 1000 m

Movement: 8L35
Features: Hours, minutes, seconds, and date
Winding: Automatic
Frequency: 28,800 beats per hour (4 Hz)
Power reserve: 50 hours

Strap: Silicone with pin buckle

Limited edition: 1,100 watches
Availability: 
From September 2020 at Seiko boutiques and retailers
Price: US$4,500, or ¥450,000 (prices exclude tax)


Seiko Diver’s Watch 55th Anniversary 1965 Diver’s Modern Re-interpretation “62MAS”
Ref. SPB149 (SBDC107 in Japan)

Diameter: 40.5 mm
Height: 13.2 mm
Material: Steel
Water resistance: 200 m

Movement: 6R35
Features: Hours, minutes, seconds, and date
Winding: Automatic
Frequency: 21,600 beats per hour (3 Hz)
Power reserve: 70 hours

Strap: Steel bracelet, and additional silicon strap

Limited edition: 5,500 watches
Availability: 
From June 2020 at Seiko boutiques and retailers
Price: US$1,350, or ¥140,000 (prices exclude tax)

For more, visit Seikowatches.com.


 

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Grand Seiko Introduces the 60th Anniversary Limited Editions

From Hi-Beat to uber-quartz.

Seiko Introduces PADI Special Edition Dive Watches, Including "Pepsi" 6309 Remake

To mark its newly minted partnership with PADI, Seiko has unveiled a pair of special edition dive watches, a Kinetic GMT Diver and Prospex Automatic Dive "Pepsi". Specs and pricing below.

: Seiko Introduces Grand Seiko Antimagnetic

Grand Seiko Introduces the Spring Drive 8 Days Jewelry SBGD205

A US$185,000 Masterpiece.

For its 60th anniversary, Grand Seiko has just unveiled one of the most extravagant, and expensive, watches ever – the Grand Seiko Masterpiece Collection Spring Drive 8 Days Jewelry Watch (ref. SBGD205).

Combining the flagship Spring Drive model – made at the artisanal Micro Artist Studio – with a lavish setting of diamonds and sapphires, the Spring Drive 8 Days Jewelry Watch is a departure from the typical, subtle formality of Grand Seiko design.

The base of the Spring Drive 8 Days Jewelry Watch is the SBGD201, an immense, heavy and refined wristwatch powered by the impressive 9R01 movement. Equipped with three barrels that give it a 192-hour power reserve, the 9R01 is finished to the same level as the much-vaunted Credor Eichi II, thought the massive full bridge means there are few details visible on the back.

 

The dial of the watch is unusual. Though Grand Seiko (and Seiko) have always produced jewelled watches for women, this is probably the first heavily gem-set men’s model in a long time.

The centre of the dial has a granular, slightly sparkly “dial dust” finish that is identical to the dial finish on the standard Grand Seiko 8 Days. But it has a subtle constellation of Leo – the Grand Seiko emblem is a lion – incorporated into the surface of the dial and visible only up close.

Around the diamond-dust centre are two white gold chapter rings, one set with large, baguette-cut stones and the other with smaller, brilliant-cut stone.

Each of the hours and five minute markings are indicated with blue sapphires, with the sapphire at 12 o’clock being slightly wider than the others to set it apart. And a large blue sapphire is set into the crown, adding up to 25 sapphires of 1.09 carats.

In between the sapphires are diamonds, functioning as minute markers of sorts, with a total of 96 diamonds weighing 2.25 carats on the dial.


Key facts

Grand Seiko Masterpiece Collection Spring Drive 8 Days Jewelry Watch
Ref. SBGD205

Diameter: 43 mm
Height: 13.5 mm
Material: Platinum
Water resistance: 100 m

Movement: 9R01
Features: Hours, minutes, seconds, and power reserve indicator
Winding: Hand-wound Spring Drive
Power reserve: 8 days (192 hours)

Strap: Crocodile with folding clasp

Limited edition: 10 pieces
Availability:
From June 2020 at Grand Seiko boutiques
Price: US$185,000, or ¥20 million (prices exclude taxes)

For more, visit Grand-seiko.com.


 

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Grand Seiko Introduces the 60th Anniversary Hi-Beat 80 Hours SLGH002

Brand-new, cutting-edge 9SA5 movement.

Of the half-dozen commemorative editions Grand Seiko is rolling out to mark its 60th anniversary, one watch is significant over all the others, because it has a brand-new calibre that represents the first of a new generation of movements. A complete rethink of the 9S family of movements – first unveiled 22 years ago – the 9SA5 makes its debut in the Grand Seiko 60th Anniversary Limited Edition (ref. SLGH002).

While the movement is cutting-edge for the brand, the design of the SLGH002 is a throwback to vintage Grand Seiko – the dial emulates the aesthetics of the first Grand Seiko 3180 of 1960 but with a modern twist, namely with widened hands and hour markers.

As a result, the dial is quintessential Grand Seiko, having a sculptural quality thanks to the broad dauphine hands and substantial, applied 18k gold hour markers. Even the frame around the date window is 18k gold.

The star above six o’clock indicates “SD”, or “special dial”, which means gold hour markers (and sometimes a gold dial)

Made of 18k yellow gold, the case has a diameter of 40 mm and a thickness of 11.7 mm. Most of its surfaces have a brushed finish, interspersed with wide, faceted bevels that are mirror polished.

The watch is notably thin for a self-winding Grand Seiko – the typical high-frequency Grand Seiko has a case just over 13 mm high – as a result of the new 9SA5 movement, which is the work of the Grand Seiko Studio Shizukuishi (formerly known as the Shizukuishi Watch Studio).

“A new chapter”

The crucial feature of the SLGH002 is the 9SA5, a movement that’s the first in a new family of 9S movements. Developed to “strike the perfect balance between precision, power and size”, the movement is a high-frequency, 5 Hz automatic with distinct features found for the first time in a Grand Seiko (or any Seiko, for that matter).

Most important is the new, patented escapement. Dubbed the Dual Impulse Escapement, it is Grand Seiko’s take on direct impulse escapement. Because it operates via a direct impulse to the balance wheel, generating minimal sliding friction (a characteristic of the traditional lever escapement), the new escapement functions with far greater efficiency.

While the Dual Impulse Escapement is reminiscent of George Daniel’s co-axial escapement – now widely used by Omega – Seiko’s escapement functions a little differently: the direct impulse occurs only in one direction of the balance wheel’s motion, and when the balance swings in the opposite direction, it transmit the impulse through the pallet fork like in a traditional escapement.

Furthermore, as in the latest, high-frequency Grand Seiko movement, the pallet fork and escapement are made using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology – essentially a method of depositing tiny amounts of metal to build up a component – resulting in complex, skeletonised parts that are lighter and consequently operate with lower inertia.

The Dual Impulse Escapement

Also notable is the use of a overcoil balance spring – a first for a contemporary Grand Seiko (or any Seiko), which have always relied on flat hairsprings. The overcoil improves isochronism, which is the regularity of the balance wheel’s oscillation regardless of position or power reserve.

But it is not the more commonly-used Breguet overcoil. Instead, Seiko developed and optimised its own curve after running over 80,000 computer simulations to determine the ideal curve. But as with a traditional Breguet overcoil, the Seiko hairspring has to be curved by hand.

The free-sprung balance wheel with an overcoil hairspring

It doesn’t stop there: the 9SA5 also marks the introduction of the free-sprung balance wheel into Grand Seiko (and Seiko) movement. The balance wheel has has four adjustable poising screws recessed in the periphery of the balance wheel. And for maximum stability and shock resistance, the balance wheel is also supported on both sides by using a balance bridge, instead of the conventional balance cock that’s anchored only on one side.

Extra thin

Powering the 9SA5 are two barrels arranged in series – they unwind one after the other – both visible under the barrel bridge. As a result, the 9SA5 manages a power reserve of 80 hours, just over three days, while being 15% slimmer than the existing high-frequency 9S85 movement, which relies on a single, thicker mainspring. Another feature that contributes to the slimness is the redesigned, horizontal layout of the gear train.

The 9SA5 was also designed to incorporate subtle elements that are distinctly to Seiko: the curves of the bridges are inspired by the silhouette of Mount Iwate – the active volcano that overlooks the Grand Seiko Studio Shizukuishi – and also by a bend in the Shizukuishi River that runs near the workshop.

Despite all of the technical innovations in the 9SA5, Grand Seiko did not neglect the practical functions of the watch – the date display has been upgraded from the “dragging” date that slowly changes over at midnight, now standard for Grand Seiko movements, to an instantaneous date that jumps in the blink of an eye.


Key facts and price

Grand Seiko 60th Anniversary Limited Edition
Ref. SLGH002

Diameter: 40.0 mm
Height: 11.7 mm
Material: 18k yellow gold
Water resistance: 100 m

Movement: 9SA5
Features: Hours, minutes, seconds, and date
Winding: Automatic
Frequency: 36,000 beats per hour (5 Hz)
Power reserve: 80 hours

Strap: Crocodile with 18k yellow gold folding clasp

Limited edition: 100 watches
Availability: 
From August 2020 at Grand Seiko boutiques
Price: US$43,000, or ¥4.5 million (prices exclude tax)

For more, visit Seikowatches.com.


 

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